SFPS Mailing: June 2010

The ‘becoming-transnational’ of French Studies

One-day Research Workshop

An event to launch the Forum for French Transcultural Studies

(Universities of Aberdeen, St Andrews, Stirling)

University of Stirling 

7 June 2010

Funded by the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland

In recent decades, the field of French Studies has undergone profound changes, not least through the development of transnational/transcultural approaches that seek to move beyond the frame of the nation-state as an organizational rationale. From a multitude of disciplinary locations (history, literature, film), we have thus witnessed what Françoise Lionnet has termed the ‘becoming-transnational’ of French Studies’. The format of this one-day workshop will allow scholars to discuss their research on French/Francophone topics and the ways in which they engage with and, in certain respects, move beyond, the nation-state.

Location: The workshop will take place in Room E26 in the Pathfoot Building. You can download a campus map from:

http://www.external.stir.ac.uk/students/campus_info/getting_here/index.php.

Programme

11.00-11.45     Registration & Tea/Coffee

 11.45-12.00     Welcoming remarks

             • David Murphy (University of Stirling); Lorna Milne (University of St Andrews)

 12.00-12.45     Keynote Speaker

 • Gary Wilder (CUNY, USA), ‘Negritude, Decolonization, Utopia’

 12.45-2.00       Lunch

 2.00-2.45         Panel 1

 • David Murphy (Stirling), Charles Forsdick (Liverpool), ‘Postcolonial Thought in the French-Speaking World’

 2.45-3.30         Panel 2

 • Bill Marshall (Stirling), ‘The French Atlantic’

• Lorna Milne (St Andrews), ‘The French Caribbean’

 3.30-4.00         Tea/Coffee

 4.00-4.45         Panel 3

 • Stephen Tyre, ‘French Imperial Futures, 1944-1960’

• Michael Syrotinski, ‘Francophone Postcolonial Africa’

 4.45-5.15         Concluding remarks

 NB There is no registration fee but those wishing to attend must register their interest in advance, and by Wednesday, 2 June at the latest. For further information, please contact Professor David Murphy: d.f.murphy@stir.ac.uk.

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Call for Papers

New Francophonies and Colonial Language Communities

in a Global World

 March 31-April 2, 2011

Co-organizers: Adlai Murdoch and Zsuzsanna Fagyal – University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 The Department of French at the University of Illinois is organizing an interdisciplinary conference on francophonies that grows out of an interest in borders, boundaries, points of interface and mixing—between languages, communities and networks (political and social), as well as genres, disciplines, and paradigms. Clearly, analyzing the role, place and history of the several varieties of French within and without the hexagon will be of cardinal importance. The conference will consider the ways in which French and other former colonial language communities imagine themselves through culture, where we understand culture as a means of expressing identity, and how they function in the worlds of literature, drama, speech, and music.

 Among the key questions and themes for possible panels and presentations are the following:

 *       How many francophonies are there? In what ways do they articulate themselves in different places?

*      To what extent are there, or will there be world Frenches?

*      Are there competing models or visions of globality or globalization, and how might they impact the study of languages, regions, and disciplines?

*     To what extent are there geographical and historical links between spaces of writing and those of representation, and how (if at all) do the former impact the latter?

*     What is the importance of such (related?) subjects as langues véhiculaires, code-switching, linguistic in-betweens and cultural hybridity, and the existence of self-contained language communities for French in a global context?

*    What importance should be accorded to France’s colonial presence and continuing influence in many of these locations?

*     What are the benefits and limitations of holding an official policy towards language, and does actual usage test the boundaries of such official policies over time?

*    What are the benefits and limitations of academic standards, practices and policies with regard to language divisions and language use?

*       How will these issues shape the future of graduate studies in the field?

 Confirmed keynote speakers:

Professor Sylvie Dubois, LSU

Professor Françoise Lionnet, UCLA

 This conference proposes to engage a potentially complex debate by addressing the issues from linguistic, historical and literary/cultural perspectives. This is appropriate since the term francophonie implies both language and literature produced in historical times and places. Our goal will be to encourage the participants to bridge disciplinary boundaries in order to find fresh entries into the questions raised and to propose entirely new questions.

 Papers may be given in English or French. Presentations selected for the conference will be considered for subsequent publication in an edited volume or journal special issue. All submissions must contain the following information:

  •  Name
  • Affiliation
  • E-mail address
  • Mailing address, phone and fax number
  • Title of proposed paper or panel
  • Brief description of same (250-500 words)

 Deadline for submission of abstracts: SEPTEMBER 30, 2010

Submissions should be sent electronically both as text and as a Word attachment to the following e-mail address: <newfrancophonies@gmail.com>

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Haitian Texts and Contexts

Wednesday 23 June 2010

 Oriel College, Oxford

Co-organizers: Eva Sansavior and Richard Scholar

 

11:20 -11:40 Welcome

 Panel One – Histories

11:40 Kate Hodgson, Wilberforce Institute for the Study of Slavery and Emancipation, Hull, ‘New Approaches to Emancipation: Haiti and the International Politics of Anti-Slavery’

 12:10 Andy Leak, University College London, ‘The Committed Intellectual: Lyonel Trouillot and the G184′

 1:00- 2:00 Lunch

 2:00 Charles Forsdick, Liverpool, ‘The Persistent Revolutionary: Recent Fictional Representations of Toussaint Louverture’

 2:40 Clive Cheesman, The College of Arms, ‘Naming the Descendants of Slaves in Haiti’

 3:20 -3:40 Panel Talk

 3:40-4:00 Tea

 Panel Two -Genres and Reception

4:00 Rachel Douglas, Liverpool, ‘Rewriting Haiti in Dany Laferrière’s Le Goût des jeunes filles’

 4:40 Andrew Asibong, Birkbeck, University of London, ‘Niger Sacer: Cinematic Ethics of the Dispensable Haitian Body in Laurent Cantet’s Vers le sud (2005)’

 5:20 Kiera Vaclavik, Queen Mary, University of London, ‘Children’s Books in Haiti: Etat des lieux’

 6:00 – 6:30 Panel Talk and Close

 7:30  Dinner

 There is no charge for attendance at the study day.

 A buffet lunch will be available for those attending on the day at the cost of £5.25. A limited amount of accommodation is also available at Oriel at the cost of £51.75 per night.

 Please register attendance, lunch and/or accommodation bookings by 08 June. Enquiries can be sent to caribbeanglobalizations@googlemail.com.

 Venez nombreux!

 Eva Sansavior

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 Call for Papers

The Francophone African Intellectual

 42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

April 7-10, 2011

New Brunswick, NJ – Hyatt New Brunswick

Host Institution:  Rutgers University 

 This panel will discuss the definitions and activities of the Francophone African intellectual, discussing such issues as the issues s/he engages, the fields s/he occupies, her/his residence and his/her relations with the State and the people. We will consider proposals defining this figure in the broadest terms, and his/her engagement across a wide field of culture, including literature, cinema and cultural criticism. Please send abstracts to Christopher Hogarth christopher.hogarth@wagner.edu.

 Deadline:  September 30, 2010 

Please include with your abstract:  

Name and Affiliation

Email address

Postal address

Telephone number

A/V requirements (if any; $10 handling fee with registration) 

 Applications are invited for the following post

Researcher/VRE developer – Francophone African & Diaspora Research
Department of Modern Languages
Faculty of Humanities

University of Chester

£14.45 – £15.79 per hour (inclusive of annual leave accrual)

10 month fixed term contract

Up to 312 hours for the duration of the contract

The University of Chester is seeking to appoint a part-time fixed term researcher to develop a virtual research environment in the field of Francophone African & Diaspora Studies. The researcher will work closely with the interdisciplinary Francophone African Research Group and the Universitys website team to construct a research platform to accommodate a range of research initiatives with a focus on francophone Africa. The platform will also accommodate projects undertaken by researchers working in francophone Africa and the francophone Caribbean in association with the University of Chester. It is expected that the researcher will complete the design and delivery of the platform by April 2011 at a rate to be negotiated with the project director. It is not expected that the researcher will be based on the campus of the University during the completion of the project but the successful applicant will need to attend regular meetings with the research group particularly in the early stages of the project. Candidates may download further details and an application form from our website at www.chester.ac.uk/jobs/ or send an A4 SAE to HRM Services, University of Chester, Parkgate Road, Chester CH1 4BJ quoting reference number HRMS/09143. Candidates are invited to contact Professor Claire Griffiths, at c.griffiths@chester.ac.uk for further information on the project.

Closing date:  Monday 14 June 2010 at 12 noon.

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University at Buffalo Department of Romance Languages and Literatures

Graduate Student Association presents

 (R)EVOLUTION in Romance Languages and Literatures

 October 1st and 2nd 2010

 Since the collapse of the Roman Empire, the languages of the former have evolved, transformed, and spread across the globe. The Romance languages and literatures diverged and reencountered each other, provoking cultural, linguistic, and literary changes and exchanges. These (r)evolutions continue into the present era and enrich our understanding of a shared past, present, and future. In order to enrich the academic conversation and establish connections, the objectives of this conference are:

 §  To foster dialogues and interdisciplinary approaches to Romance languages and literatures

 §  To showcase future scholars and create a forum for young scholars to converse across disciplines about trends in research and pedagogy

 §  To encourage the discussion of connections between Romance literatures and languages and between literary studies and linguistics

 §  To connect literary and linguistic research with other fields such as history, anthropology, philosophy, sociology, education, psychology, media studies, and the arts

 Potential topics include:

 Bodies                          Language policy and planning

Gender                         Social linguistics

Sexuality                       Literary pragmatics

Maternity                      Language contact

Politics             Second language acquisition     

Society             Teaching methodology

Exile                             Language evolution

Monsters                      Bilingualism

Otherness                     Globalization

Migration                      Local cultures

Storytelling                   Law

Pluralism                       History

 Deadline for abstracts is June 25th. Papers will be accepted in Romance languages and English. The RLL GSA aims to publish the proceedings of the conference. Abstracts should be 250 words. Send abstract with proposed title as an attachment in Microsoft Word or PDF to UBRomance@gmail.com.

 This event is sponsored by the Romance Languages and Literatures Graduate Student Association.

Conference will be held on the University at Buffalo, North Campus.

 Department of Romance Languages and Literatures

University at Buffalo, North Campus

910 Clemens Hall

Buffalo, NY 14221

Finally here are some details from Bart Miller for those of you travelling to the forthcoming SFPS postgraduate workshop ‘New Directions in Francophone Postcolonial Studies: The Challenge of a Materialist Critique’.:

 Workshop details on the SOCLAS website:

http://www.liv.ac.uk/soclas/conferences/index.htm

 Map of Liverpool University Campus:

http://www.liv.ac.uk/maps/liverpool-university-campus-map.pdf

 Accommodation suggestions :

 Travelodge Liverpool Central

25 Old Haymarket,

Liverpool, Merseyside L1 6ER

0871 984 6156‎

 

Feathers Hotel‎

115-117 Mount Pleasant,

Liverpool, Merseyside L3 5TF

0151 709 9655‎ – 0151 709 2020‎

– 0151 709 3838‎ (Fax)

 

         Cocoon Hotel @ International Inn‎

Off Hardman St, 4 South Hunter St,

Liverpool, Merseyside L1 9JG

0151 709 8135

 

            Premier Inn

            Liverpool City Centre‎

            Vernon Street, Liverpool,

            Merseyside L2 2AY0871

            527 8624‎ – 0871 527 8625‎ (Fax)

 

  • All are welcome to meet on Wednesday 9th June at 2 p.m. at the International Slavery Museum (Albert Dock).  It’s inside the Maritime Museum. Here is a link to both the museum website and  a map of the area:

 http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/ism/

 

http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=International+Slavery+Museum,+Hartley+Quay&sll=53.401286,-2.992959&sspn=0.013305,0.032015&ie=UTF8&hq=International+Slavery+Museum&hnear=International+Slavery+Museum,+Hartley+Quay,+Liverpool,+L3+4,+UK&filter=0&update=1&z=15

 

  • Here’s the plan for post-day activities on the 10th. From 5-5:30, those interested can meet at a very nearby pub (The Cambridge) for a quick drink. After this, we’re going to The Quarter (Falkner St) for a meal. Please e-mail me (Bart Miller f.b.miller@liv.ac.uk) if you’re interested in the meal!